Luke Buchanan: Parameters

Luke Buchanan: Parameters

Opening Reception: Friday December 14, 6 to 9 p.m.

Fourth Friday Reception: December 28, 6 to 9 p.m.

Closing Reception: Friday January 18, 6 to 9 p.m.

Gallery Hours by appointment; email us.

Luke Buchanan is a painter and mixed media artist based in Raleigh, NC. With a formal education in architecture, Buchanan has translated his connection with man-made spaces into visual metaphors for the experience of memory. His most recent collection of work explores not only physical space itself but also the accumulated feelings and memories that are attached to it. Collage materials provide both a physical connection to the past and references to the transitory nature of life. In this way Buchanan documents space; physical, spiritual, and emotional, by defining its parameters.

About Anchorlight Wilmington

Anchorlight Wilmington is a short-term artistic activation of space in downtown Wilmington that seeks to contribute to the vibrant arts community through exhibitions, residency opportunities and community programming. Located at 1 S. Front St., the project is an extension of the creative space in Raleigh called Anchorlight that is home to artist studios, exhibitions and production space.

Brightwork Series: William Paul Thomas

Brightwork Series: William Paul Thomas

Opening reception: Saturday 11/3, 4:00-7:00pm

Exhibition Tour with the Artist: Saturday 11/17, 2:00pm

Closing reception + Artist Talk with Special Guests: Saturday 12/1, 4:00-7:00pm

2017-2018 Brightwork Fellow, William Paul Thomas, presents the latest in an ongoing series of portraiture through the exhibition, Super Normal. These explorations began in 2015 with the portrait of Thomas’ nephew, Michael. In the years that followed Thomas has expanded the series to include men he has developed personal relationships with, some over long periods of time, and others in brief connections such as a daily commute to work.

These portraits are designed to be an intimate gesture of love and recognition to the subject presented. Thomas uses the process of painting as a unique way to record the significance of his connection with each individual. The subjects are presented as busts, elevating the individual to the status of iconography and challenging the viewer’s perceptions of encounters with anonymous Black men. Each subject’s skin tone transitions into a rich blue tone, a reference to the condition known as cyanosis; blueness of the skin that results from improperly oxygenated blood. This marking of the face becomes a metaphor for the disenfranchisement that people of color have experienced by way of white supremacist ideologies. The partially veiled portraits serve as a way to honor everyday people, in direct contradiction to the glorification of celebrities, and reflect the impact each individual has had on the day to day life of the artist.


Susan Keiser, A River Made of Time and Memory

Susan Keiser, A River Made of Time and Memory

Opening reception: Friday October 5, 6:00-9:00pm

Click! Photography Festival presents Susan Keiser, A River Made of Time and Memory. 

“Rivers are one of the abiding metaphors for the human condition. They begin as mountain trickles, grow deep and powerful, spread wide and calm, until at the end, they open their mouths to the sea. We usually envision them as flat blue ribbons, but they are deep and layered. While the current flows inexorably in one direction, its changeable speed cycles objects from surface to bed, creating a second, unseen river of memories. One can never step in the same river twice, just as the stories we tell ourselves about ourselves grow and change over time. My photographs describe my world, not the day-to-day of it, but the sun-born visions and night-bound terrors that memories create and re-create but can’t be seen or understood until pictured. 
I work with a family of four-inch dolls, mass-produced over six decades ago. Intuitive, improvised, my photographs are created entirely in-camera and in available light.”
-Susan Keiser

Susan Keiser is a fine art photographer whose work reflects her long experience in the arts and horticulture. Painter/poet, gardener/naturalist, writer/editor; she has always been concerned with the real-world expression of memories, dreams, and conceptual ideas.

Her photographs have been exhibited widely both domestically and abroad, in solo shows at The Griffin Museum of Photography, Winchester, MA, and The Barrett Art Center, Poughkeepsie, NY, and in juried group shows at venues including The Center for Fine Art Photography, CO; Los Angeles Center of Photography; PH21 Gallery, Budapest Hungary; Texas Photographic Society, Houston; Baxton Gallery, Brussels, Belgium; the Cleveland Print Room; and the Berlin Foto Biennale.

The recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts grant, Keiser attended Pomona College and holds a BFA in painting from The Cooper Union and a diploma from The New York Botanical Garden’s School of Professional Horticulture.

Kidnapped Pagans by Antoine Williams

Kidnapped Pagans by Antoine Williams

Opening reception June 8, 5:00-8:00pm

Gallery hours: Saturdays and Sundays 1:00-4:00

                         Weekdays by appointment

   Kidnapped Pagans, organized by Jonell Logan, founder of 300 Art Project, is a public/private art installation featuring the work of Antione Williams. Engaging in issues of history, culture, and the black experience, Williams combines drawing, painting, and collage to present and challenge the spaces that people of color occupy within our society.  This show, which was installed in Charlotte in 2017 will be on view in Raleigh in partnership with Anchorlight. 

   Kidnapped Pagans began as one model for community ownership and engagement in the arts. As an independent curator, Logan originally partnered with The Mint Museum, individual property owners, Charlotte Center City Partners and Charlotte Urban Design, City of Charlotte, to bring the work to Charlotte. In addition to being at The Mint, the original exhibition included work by Antoine Williams being installed on newspaper kiosks and private buildings throughout Charlotte.  The intention was to expand the exhibition beyond the museum boundaries, foster personal interaction with the work within our communities, and expand our collective understanding of how and where art can impact our lives. A smaller but just as impactful installation of the exhibition will take place in Raleigh, in the galleries and on the exterior walls of Anchorlight. 

   This dually-installed, public exhibition allows for a continuation of support of new and experimental methods of contemporary art making in North Carolina. Kidnapped Pagans creates a timely and creative dialogue around class, race and narrative within the African America perspective. Williams’ work provides a unique opportunity to engage contemporary art, culture, narrative in a way that can foster greater exchange and understanding in a growing and learning city.

About the Curator:

Kidnapped Pagans is organized by Jonell Logan, an independent curator and founder of 300 Arts Project. Logan recently curated the Lilith exhibition at The Light Factory, on view through April 6, 2017. Logan has worked at various museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Studio Museum in Harlem.

About the Artist:

   Antoine Williams’ art practice is an investigation of his cultural identity through the exploration of societal signs as they relate to institutional inequities. He has created a mythology, which have become a narrative catalogue of loosely autobiographical humanoid beings that personify the complexities of perception, which can affect race, class, and masculinity. His works of art are heavily influenced by sci-fi literature from such authors as Octavia Butler and H.G. Wells. Themes in science fiction can be analogous to the Black experience in America. Therefore, Williams has created a world of beings that personify the complexity within hierarchies of power in everyday life. These figures manifest as mixed-media installations, paintings, drawings, and collage. These entities reference the Dadaist, who appropriated and re-contextualized images from society in order to create “anti-art”. Namely Hans Arp, who considered the destruction of “signs” as a subversive act. The signs he is interested in are tropes associated with the Black body within the American psyche.

   In the vein of Felix Gonzales-Torres, Williams has a concern for making the personal, public. These beings (which are nameless) are inspired by personal experiences from a rural working class, upbringing, in Red Springs, North Carolina that related to wider contemporary concerns. Inspired by the Amiri Baraka poem “Something in the Way of Things”, these beings live in the intangible spaces that exist between the nuances of class and race. They are both born of and perpetuate the actions and thought processes due to social reproduction. They exist in an abstracted purgatory.

Brightwork Series: Cliff Elliott

Brightwork Series: Cliff Elliott

   Opening reception: Saturday May 12, 6:00-10:00pm

   Closing reception: Saturday May 26, 6:00-10:00pm

   Cliff Elliott’s prints and collages act as a means to express touchstones of personal experience and explore the question, “How does one function as an ever-changing self in an ever-changing world?”

   In Heavy Color/Nothing Much, Elliot draws from a formal education in graphic design and illustration, piecing together compositions that are reminiscent of Pop-Art traditions through their use of both original and appropriated imagery. He has taken possession of images found in the cultural landscape with the intent of subverting their meaning by placing them in a new context. The resulting collages are full of contradictions, irony, meaning, and nonsense.

   Elliott’s process involves the meticulous collection and cataloging of visual elements into a lexicon that is then used to construct each work. He uses a set of parameters for production that turns the process of creating the work into a potentially un-winnable game. The resulting prints, some of which have been further embellished through mixed media collage, are meant to be irreverent reminders to question how we view and digest an inherently unknowable world. 

   Heavily influenced by the principles of the Fluxus movement of the 1960s, his body of work attempts to cloud the boundaries between art and life. The everyday experience is to be considered just as valuable as the artistic experience as both are simultaneously sacred and unholy.

   Heavy Color/Nothing Much is an exhibition in two parts. Part I, Heavy Color located in the Center Gallery, looks outward through a series of bold, complex images that study the nature of being as it is reflected in the world around us. Part II, Nothing Much located in the Brightwork Gallery, contains an installation compiled of source material that contributed to the making of Heavy Color and is an exploration of the internal self before being influenced by the surrounding world.

Generation Z

Generation Z

Generation Z is an art show created and curated by Southeast Raleigh High School students.  From the creation of the theme, to the content of the exhibit, the students run the show. The show will contain work that reflects how the students view themselves, others, and the world in which they live.

Right Before We Fly: Dare Coulter

Right Before We Fly: Dare Coulter

Opening Reception Saturday March 3, 4:00-7:00

The Black On Black Project presents "Right Before We Fly" by Dare Coulter. It's the first exhibition from the Jo Ann Williams Artist Fellowship and opens Saturday March 3. 

The inaugural fellowship recipient, Dare Coulter, shares a sculptural installation that focuses on our audacity to dream beyond the limitations that are set before us. Coulter challenges the voices of those telling us who we can and cannot be.

The opening reception is 4 to 7 p.m. You’ll meet the artist, learn more about the Black On Black Project plus see a special dance performance featuring Masha Maddux, former principal dancer with the Martha Graham Dance Company.

Gallery hours by appointment, email info@blackonblackproject.com for appointments

Kye + Hardy & Liz Kelly Pop Up

Kye + Hardy & Liz Kelly Pop Up

Saturday February 24, 2:00-5:00

Asheville based quilter Kelly Kye and Raleigh potter Liz Kelly will be popping up at Anchorlight this Saturday! Kelly Kye will have piecework pillows, small quilts, napkins, and more beautiful small framed piecework pieces. Liz Kelly is making an assortment of serving bowls, planters, cups, mugs, plates, vases and other clay home goods. This is also your last chance to see the exhibition Piece(Work) by Kelly Kye! Hope to see you there!

Resident Artist Series: Tim Lytvinenko

Resident Artist Series: Tim Lytvinenko

Our Resident Artist Series continues with an exhibition of large scale photo transfers and prints entitled Liminality, by Tim Lytvinenko. 

Opening reception: Saturday February 10, 6:00-9:00pm

Closing reception: Saturday March 10, 6:00-9:00pm

Gallery hours: Every Saturday and Sunday during the exhibition run, 1:00-5:00pm

                       During the week by appointment

Tim Lytvinenko's new series of works, Liminality, tells a personal story of transition. These large scale photo transfers on wood panels resemble a threshold of change with portraits and elemental subjects.

Piece(Work): Kelly Kye

Piece(Work): Kelly Kye

Piece(Work): Kelly Kye

 

Opening reception: Saturday February 10, 6:00-9:00pm

Closing reception + Trunk Show: Saturday February 24, 2:00-5:00pm

Gallery hours: Saturday February 18 + Sunday February 19, 1:00-5:00pm

                        During the week by appointment

 

 The quilts in this exhibition are a collection of large and small pieces that embody the passage of time through process and material.  Each quilt and new design brings the lessons learned and pieces of cloth left from the one before. 

Kelly Kye is a quilter and lover of quilted things, living and working in Asheville, NC.  She has a formal textile background, receiving her BFA from East Carolina University and Masters of Art + Design at North Carolina State University. She has called North Carolina home for most of her life with a chunk of time working in New York City. Her passion for quilting came after years of slowly realizing the craft of her mother, grandmother and great grandmother could be modern, challenging and rewarding. Her thoughtful quilt business, KYE + HARDY, uses her design and production experience to create one of a kind hand crafted products with reverence for tradition and the home they will live in.

Distance: Ely Urbanski

Distance: Ely Urbanski

Distance: Ely Urbanski

Opening reception: Saturday February 10, 6:00-9:00pm

Closing reception: Saturday March 10, 6:00-9:00pm

Gallery hours: Every Saturday and Sunday during the exhibition run, 1:00-5:00pm

                       During the week by appointment

 

This series of prints on paper and fabric is derived from the patterns and experiences of passengers commuting on São Paulo subway system. The use of found materials such as  fabric, buttons, subway tickets, and handwritten letters is an attempt to merge the memories, colors, and experiences of the journey into the prints. The works represent two points set apart in space but connected in time, psyche, and memory. 

Resident Artist Series: Chuck Rose

Resident Artist Series: Chuck Rose

Our Resident Artist Series continues with an exhibition titled Reconciled by painter Chuck Rose.

Opening Reception: Saturday 1/13, 6:00-9:00

Closing Reception: Saturday 1/20, 6:00-9:00

Gallery Hours by appointment

This series of new paintings represents the artist's newfound sense of peace with his work. Embracing change has allowed Rose to work with color in new and exciting ways and has distilled his process to what he believes to be the essence of his inspiration.

3Film Series presents: Something From Nothing

3Film Series presents: Something From Nothing

December 8, 9, 10, all showtimes 7:00pm

Curated by Brightwork Fellow Cliff Elliott The 3Film Series is a three day screening event which explores and celebrates intriguing narratives and themes throughout a small selection of films. Our pilot series, Something From Nothing, is a fascinating examination of the creative process itself. The documentaries selected illustrate the drive and determination, joy and courage necessary to realize one's vision. They are:

 Friday, December 8th: The Burden of Dreams

For nearly five years, acclaimed German filmmaker Werner Herzog desperately tried to complete one of the most ambitious and difficult films of his career, Fitzcarraldo, the story of one man's attempt to build an opera house deep in the Amazon jungle. Documentary filmmaker Les Blank captured the unfolding of this production, made more perilous by Herzog s determination to shoot the most daunting scenes without models or special effects, including a sequence requiring hundreds of native Indians to pull a full-size, 320-ton steamship over a small mountain. The result is an extraordinary document of the filmmaking process and a unique look into the single-minded mission of one of cinema s most fearless directors.

Saturday, December 9th: An American Movie

The film chronicles the making of "Coven", an independent horror film directed by filmmaker Mark Borchardt. Produced for the purpose of raising capital for another film that Borchardt intends to make, the epic "Northwestern", "Coven" suffers from numerous setbacks, including poor financing, a lack of planning, Borchardt's burgeoning alcoholism, and the ineptitude of the friends and family Borchardt hires as his production team. The documentary follows Borchardt's filmmaking process from script to screen, and is interspersed with footage from both developing projects.

Sunday, December 10th: Jodorwosky's Dune

In 1975, director Alejandro Jodorowsky began work on his most ambitious project yet. Starring his own 12-year-old son alongside Orson Welles, Mick Jagger, David Carradine and Salvador Dalí, featuring music by Pink Floyd and art by some of the most provocative talents of the era, including H.R. Giger and Jean “Moebius” Giraud, Jodorowsky’s adaptation of the classic sci-fi novel DUNE was poised to change cinema forever. Through interviews with legends and luminaries and an intimate and honest conversation with Jodorowsky himself, director Frank Pavich’s film unearths the full saga of ‘The Greatest Movie Never Made’.

Each film offers a unique look into the dedication, bravery and, ultimately, obsession that is poured into each of the above-mentioned projects.  These three documentaries all wonderfully illuminate the artist's journey.

Click! Photography Festival

Click! Photography Festival

We are so excited to host the Click! Photography Festival this weekend at Anchorlight! There’s a lot going on and so many ways to take part in the fun. 

Stop by and have a tin type portrait made by Leah Sobsey and Tim Telkamp’s Mobile Tin Type Unit Friday and Saturday 10am-4pm
On Sunday the 29th, during our Closing Party, we will exhibit the work Leah and Tim made shooting a series of tintype portraits throughout underserved neighborhoods and at Click! events.

Stick around Friday night for a presentation and short film by the crew that is bringing us the Big Polaroid 20x 24 camera. 7:00pm, free. 

Join us Sunday 10/29 6pm-11pm for the festival wrap party! On view will be Instantaneous: A Polaroid Legacy and a pop-up exhibition by Leah Sobsey and Tim Telkamp.

Artcurious podcast: weegee

Artcurious podcast: weegee

Friday, October 20, 7:00pm Free

When many think about the presentation of death in modern art, Andy Warhol's Death and Disaster series springs to mind as the epitome of pop exploitation. But Warhol wasn't the first artist to focus on the everyday tragedy of death as a subject to quite this revealing and ruthless extent. That honor might very well belong to someone else: an immigrant photographer working in Manhattan in the 1930s and 1940s. Join Jennifer Dasal, the creator and host of the ArtCurious Podcast, for a discussion about Weegee, the original tabloid photographer whose legacy looms large.

Instantaneous: The Polaroid Legacy

Instantaneous: The Polaroid Legacy

Opening Reception Friday October 6, 6:00-9:00

Closing Reception + Festival Wrap Party Sunday October 29, 6:00-midnight

Anchorlight is participating in the month long CLICK! Photography Festival with an exhibition celebrating the Polaroid image. From its inception in 1947, the Polaroid system inspired artists to experiment–to dazzling effect–with the cameras’ unique technologies. Edwin Land, the inventor of the first Polaroid instant camera, remarked on his discovery, “Photography will never be the same.” And he was right. Polaroid photographs have been used and ingeniously manipulated by Walker Evans, David Hockney, Barbara Kasten, Robert Mapplethorpe, Lucas Samaras, and others. Polaroids affected and, in many instances, forever changed the way they captured the world around them.

The qualities of the various Polaroid films are unique and hard to duplicate with any other medium. The popularity of these films is said to have been an inspiration to companies like Hipstamatic and Lomography. The artists in this exhibition represent the incredible diversity of creative approaches to using this medium.

Resident Artist Series: Pete Sack

Resident Artist Series: Pete Sack

Anchorlight resident artist Pete Sack uses abstracted portraiture as a means of unfinished storytelling. The process allows Sack to explore both his own identity and the true nature of self. Using the color blue as a touchstone in each piece, Sack works intuitively and allows the faces in the paintings to guide him as their story is revealed. Each face is masked by swaths of color and shape, creating a portrait not only of a subject but of the parts of ourselves we normally obscure.

September 16-23

Opening Reception September 16 6:00-9:00

Free Lunch

Free Lunch

In “Free Lunch,” Lamar Whidbee raises questions about the social conditions of students that come from impoverished areas of America and how they’re represented in gifted programs within the school system.

Constant Bearing

Constant Bearing

Opening Reception
Saturday 7/22, 6:00-9:00pm

Closing Reception
Saturday 7/29, 6:00-9:00pm
Artist Talk, 7/29, 7:00pm

Gallery Hours by appointment

Constant Bearing: 
A nautical term describing a situation in which two ships approach one another while maintaining the same relative bearing, indicating a collision course.

Through meticulously hand drawn images the exhibition, Constant Bearing, represents the artist’s view of the current climate of the world, both political and environmental. Eichenberger uses animal allegories to express the frustration he feels watching the country’s two major parties use hostility and fear to promote a culture of denial. Created during the 2016 election year and post-election 2017, this body of work reflects the sense of uneasiness that gripped the nation, spurred on by the twenty-four hour news cycle. The events surrounding the presidential election have obsessed the artist, sparking debates amongst family and friends, and a deep feeling of dread. Instead of turning away from such difficult feelings Eichenberger has chosen to embrace them and let them fuel his practice. 
The major themes of Constant Bearing are self-destruction, defeatism, and the fight or flight mentality. Eichenberger uses iconic symbols of history such as the scarab, the serpent, the elephant and the donkey to create imagery that appears innocuous but contains a darker underlying meaning.

The Anxious Condition

The Anxious Condition

Opening Reception, Friday, May 12, 6-9pm

Gallery Hours: Saturday, May 13, 12-5pm

This 2-day exhibition is a result of UNC, Chapel Hill’s spring MFA Seminar. In the seminar, Professor elin o'hara slavick and students focused on curating – from Hans Ulrich Obrist, Paul Virilio and Theaster Gates’ theories and practices to their own. THE ANXIOUS CONDITION is the 4th and final collaborative/curatorial project of the seminar. Drawing from the previous exhibitions at atypical sites and their studios, slavick has selected work that touches upon anxiety. In this unpresidential time of ...